Two types of fossil dating

This "carving" can produce a visible indentation in the rock, or it can simply be the scratching away of a weathered surface to reveal unweathered material of a different color below.The bighorn sheep carved into an orange-brown sandstone, shown near the top of this page, is a petroglyph.Because of the distortions and lies spread by fundamentalists about scientific dating there is a need for a centralized source of information on the topic.A few examples of such lies are presented at the very bottom of this page.Location: Megalodon evolved from Carcharocles Subauriculatus sometime in the Miocene, and became extinct at the end of the Pliocene 2.6 million years ago.It is not alive today, and has been dead for millions of years.Overview of Methods Superposition Stratigraphy Dendrochronology Radiocarbon C14 Radiometric Dating Methods Obsidian Hydration Dating Paleomagnetic/Archaeomagnetic Luminescence Dating Methods Amino Acid Racemization Fission-track Dating Ice Cores Varves Pollens Corals Cation Ratio Fluorine Dating Patination Oxidizable Carbon Ratio Electron Spin Resonance Cosmic-ray Exposure Dating This is an excellent overview of dating methodologies, and is a chapter in a textbook on Archaeology.You may find it useful for the clear definitions, and for excellent links on a variety of topic.

A fossil can be studied to determine what kind of organism it represents, how the organism lived, and how it was preserved.

For each dating or chronological method there is a link in the box at right to take you to that section of this page.

There, you will find a brief description of the method, plus links to take you to other webpages with more extensive information.

Tooth Size: The more reliable body size estimates go up to around 60 feet. The average size of a megalodon was around 33 feet.

megalodons were a little larger than the modern day Whale Shark, and over twice as large as a Great White shark. Diet: With teeth that could reach over 7 inches, and a body more massive than a T-Rex, Megatooth sharks, particularly Carcharocles Megalodon, are undoubtedly the most infamous of all prehistoric sharks. By now, most paleontologists believe the Megatooth shark lineage dates back to the giant mackerel shark of the Paleocene, Otodus obliquus.